Emma West: England’s John Rocker Moment

Years from now, a young, impressionable student will ask where you were on that day.
Those who can see — Emma West’s John Rocker moment

The teacher, thinking of the many hours that were once spent – for decades – inculcating students about the horrors and depredations that Rosa Parks went through to integrate public transportation (so that only Black people could ride), smiles, remembering that during those dark days major media outlets tried to claim that white babies were inherently racist.

“There was something called Teach for America,” she replies, all of the eyes in the classroom fixed on her. “It was widely accepted in that time that with more money and resources, and the best and brightest dedicated their abilities to teaching minority students, that we could improve their test scores to the standard established by whites.”
 The memory of the two years she spent in one of the worst schools in St. Louis, with 10 resources officers dedicated to maintaining the peace and metal detectors spread throughout the school to warn of guns or knives being brought in by “students” floods her mind.
“No matter how passionately people believed in change, there was no hope,” she muttered, while slowly running her left hand across the scar on her back where one of those students in St. Louis stabbed her.
After a moment of hesitation, the teacher slowly rises to her feet. “The news media made the sensational claim that a mother, much like the one who cares for you and loves you at home, was evil for daring to point out that her country was overrun with people who didn’t belong there.”
It was this incident that the young student had hoped to have addressed.
“Early that same year riots had broken out all across that country, where people who looked similar to the ones that this mother addressed on a train in London, burned, looted, and pillaged the cities when – 60 years earlier – there weren’t any of those people in the country. In some cases, these people made us undress as a form of humiliation.”
Shuddering at the recollection of the tyranny that once existed, where people who voiced opposition to the ruling regime were denounced as mentally deranged for espousing such views, the teacher finally answers the student’s question.
“I was in a coffee shop in St. Louis. A friend e-mailed over this video of that very mother who would say things that anyone who ever rode public transportation would privately think to themselves, but publicly refrain from saying for fear of the consequences.”
Walking to one of the windows in the classroom, the teacher stared outside to view a world where that tyranny was now gone. Turning to nothing but anxious young faces hoping to soak up as much knowledge as possible, she said, “for her words, she was arrested. In the eyes of ruling establishment, she had committed treason by daring to articulate what those in power knew a large percentage of the population were privately thinking.”
Every student in the room knew the details of this story.
“But then I read where they took her son away and placed her in “protective care” which meant she was to be treated as clinically sick. I sat in my chair at that coffee shop for two hours without moving. It was at that moment I realized that the concept of freedom – which was birthed in the very nation where that mother was now in custody – had failed.”
Hunching ever so slightly on her desk with her hands propping her up, the teacher stared right at the little boy who had posed the question, and, with a smile, said, “I wasn’t the only one.”
History is full of minor moments that become the impetus for major change; incidents that are seemingly trivial at the time they transpire, but end up as powerful rallying points because they address the private concerns of millions.
As one of Albion’s Seed, the rise of tyranny in England is sad, but the rise of tyranny in Black-Run America (BRA) is even worse. Recall when Atlanta Braves pitcher was forced to undergo mental evaluation for saying this to a Sports Illustrated reporter:
JOHN ROCKER has opinions, and there’s no way to sugarcoat them. They are politically incorrect, to say the least, and he likes to express them. 
·  On ever playing for a New York team: “I would retire first. It’s the most hectic, nerve-racking city. Imagine having to take the [Number] 7 train to the ballpark, looking like you’re [riding through] Beirut next to some kid with purple hair next to some queer with AIDS right next to some dude who just got out of jail for the fourth time right next to some 20-year-old mom with four kids. It’s depressing.”
·  On New York City itself: “The biggest thing I don’t like about New York are the foreigners. I’m not a very big fan of foreigners. You can walk an entire block in Times Square and not hear anybody speaking English. Asians and Koreans and Vietnamese and Indians and Russians and Spanish people and everything up there. How the hell did they get in this country?”
 For these comments, Rocker was suspended, forced to undergo psychological testing and endure “sensitivity” training, not to mention paying a $20,000 fine.
Those who have ever wondered the origins of “Paul Kersey” need look no further than this incident. What he said was true and for speaking this he was sent to have his sanity tested.
The same thing that happened to Rocker now has happened to Emma West in England. Worse, her young child has been removed from her (while in America, this is allowed to produced 15 children, all paid for by the state).
 Whitopias allow bus routes or a train station to be built near their city, inevitably the Black Undertow will follow, immediately dropping property value.
Or in Cleveland, because Black people refuse to pay for public transit, fares go up for everyone else. In Detroit, Black bus drivers are afraid to go into parts of that city because Black people beat them up. In Atlanta and Montgomery, public transportation is basically a jobs program for otherwise unemployable Black people and a mode of transportation that is exclusively Black. DART in Dallas isn’t much different.
Once, a person asked if you could quantify the cost of Black people to America. The answer is no, because you’d have to factor in car repairs, gas, road maintenance, lost of productivity from commuting to and from work, etc., for those who have fled major cities to Whitopias. It could be argued that massive traffic jams all around America’s major metropolitan areas are directly related to white flight from cities that are now majority Black — which means by virtue of that fact, they are unlivable.
The age of Black-Run America (BRA) will end; but it will only end when people realize that this tyranny must be confronted.
Though a seemingly insignificant event that YouTube and other social media has helped go viral, the Emma West video – the Epic Tram Lady – and the subsequent reaction by the state (her arrest and the removal of her son from her custody) show that courage in the face of tyranny and persecution is our only ally.
Not only America, but England and all of the West is ruled by anarcho-tyranny (how many Muslims have been arrested for calling for the death of Englishmen while protesting in London?) which ensures that anyone who voices reasonable opposition to BRA or the entrenched political class – Disingenuous White Liberals bent on globalization – will be declared insane and forced to undergo mental evaluation.
So that they can be made an example of, lest others realize their “marginalized” views are actually shared by millions.
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