I Drink Your Milkshake: Rising Gas Prices and the End of Escaping the Black Undertow

I drink your milkshake: The end of cheap gas means the end of Black-Run America (BRA)

So much to do, so little time to do it. Lately, due to working on finishing three books (and researching Detroit’s history for the definitive story on the impending collapse of Black-rule in that city as well) and shoring up the details of a Fair Campaign that *could* have major ramifications, I feel like SBPDL has suffered. Traffic has never been higher, but too many stories are being neglected.

I’m working on four articles for VDare, but wanted to pose this question to all SBPDL readers: Gas prices are rising (as the purchasing power of the dollar declines, plus the pernicious influence of inflation and the increased demand for oil from “developing” nations) and will reach levels that will negatively impact American families budgets.

Mind you, those budgets are now reliant on the Dollar Store Economy to help stretch the buying power of the dollar farther and farther:

Over the past few years, arguably no retail faction has experienced as much success as dollar stores. Dollar General has just about doubled its number of locations in the past decade. There are now more than 9,800 Dollar General stores nationwide, making it the country’s largest retailer by location count.Dollar Tree opened its 4,000th store in 2010, after hitting the 3,000 mark four years ago. Family Dollar, meanwhile, has about 7,000 locations in North America, and expects to add 450 to 500 more this fiscal year.
According to one study, as of mid-2011, the four main dollar stores (those named above, as well as 99¢ Only) outnumbered major drugstore chains in the U.S., 21,500 to 19,700.
The study, from research firm Colliers International, indicates that dollar stores have gone mainstream and become more acceptable, even in relatively upscale shopping areas.

Nothing showcases the glory of open-border madness, free trade policies wiping out wealth creating manufacturing jobs, a libertarian-friendly service economy, and collapsing majority Black inner-cities like the dollar store economy. It should be noted that 10 years ago I found a copy of The Bell Curve at a Dollar Store (walked in to buy toilet paper to roll a friend’s house– think economically when you plan to TP a house!), which is still the best dollar I’ve ever spent. 


On this same line of thinking, many economists, sociologists, and apologists blame the decline of Detroit under the  Actual Black Run America (ABRA) government on the highway system that enabled white flight to cheap land around the city. Whitopia’s – those temporary “Drifter Colonies” – instantly sprung up around not only Detroit, but major cities throughout America, when cheap gas made it possible for families to move away from the crime and societal confusion of densely populated metropolises and live in a beautiful home with the white picket fence. 


Gas prices have fluctuated during the exodus of white people from major cities to the suburbs, but father’s (and increasingly mother’s) have continued to spend upwards to two hours each day (10 hours a week, forty hours a month, 480 hours a year – the equivalent of 20 full days) just to avoid living in cities with too many Black people. 


This is why we have stated the greatest ecological threat is not some fatuous notion of man-made global warming, but the continued misapplication of resources to escape the Black Undertow (which drives down property value, drives away businesses, increases crime and the need for greater law enforcement budgets, stresses entitlement programs, and overwhelms a school system with discipline problems and poor academic performances) enhances the carbon footprint of white American’s trying to raise a family in an environment that seeks to replicate 1950s America. 


I came across this fantastic site that shows historic gas prices over the past six years, and it offers form fields where you can customize your search for hundreds of cities in the United  States.



We live in the end of a historic era; few even dare contemplate what this means for the future policy positions, but I believe historians will look back on the past sixty years of American history and point to the availability of cheap gas as one of the key variables as to why we delayed addressing the real reasons racial inequalities persist in America. White Americans could escape into the suburbs — even those that would inevitably be overwhelmed with Climate Change — and raise families far removed from the negative influences of Black America. 



Just look at the strange geographic look of a Metro Atlanta, where the suburbs jettison out in every direction from the City too Busy to Hate. The same can be said for any major metropolitan city in America that has a large Black population.

Gas prices are rising at a record pace. Hardworking American families are seeing more and more of their after-tax income and budget going to pay to fill up their car. This will only get worse as the year moves on and gas prices rise higher.

The end of escaping Black-Run America (BRA) is upon us. It’s no longer economically viable.

We at SBPDL believe this is a good thing. This is why the Fair Campaign (Exist) which will be slowly unveiled over the coming weeks is so important.

The end of abandoning city after city to the future fury of ABRA is now. The end of escaping into suburban America and the abandonment of ‘Manifest Destiny’ for a ‘Black-Run Destiny’ is now. 

Tomorrow, we’ll discuss why the concept of a “Green City” can’t transpire unless the Black population is below five percent. We’ll introduce the concept of what an actual “Green Job” represents. And soon, we’ll discuss what “Mini-Sweden’s” are, and how they are popping up all across America.

http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/dynamic/imgs/101020/i-drink-your-milkshake_320.jpg

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